Vaccinations

TRAVEL VACCINES (INCLUDING YELLOW FEVER)
(VACCINE’S SOLD ON SITE AT A RATE CHEAPER THAN CHEMISTS)

  • HEPATITIS A & B
  • MENINGITIS
  • TYPHOID
  • YELLOW FEVER

Ideally, make an appointment 4 to 6 weeks before your trip.

Most vaccines take time to become effective in your body and some vaccines must be given in a series over a period of days or sometimes weeks.

If it is less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see your doctor. You might still benefit from shots or medications and other information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while travelling.

Are you aware of which types of vaccinations you or those traveling with you may need?

CDC divides vaccines for travel into three categories: routine, recommended, and required. While your doctor will tell you which ones you should have, it’s best to be aware of them ahead of time.

YELLOW FEVER

Yellow fever, a disease transmitted by mosquitoes, is endemic in certain areas of Africa and South America. Proof of yellow fever vaccination is required for entry into some countries. Infants and children aged >9 months can be vaccinated if they travel to countries within the yellow fever-endemic zone.

CHILDHOOD VACCINATIONS

Hepatitis B Vaccine

Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid and Pertussis Vaccine

Haemophilus influenzae Type b Conjugate Vaccine

Polio Vaccine

Rotavirus Vaccine

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine (MMR)

Varicella Vaccine

Meningococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal Vaccines

Hepatitis A Vaccine or Immune Globulin for Hepatitis A

Q FEVER

Q Fever can be acquired from the air. Humans catch it from animals. Domestic and wild animals are infected, sometimes without any apparent signs of infection. The disease is caused by a germ called Coxiella Burnetti. Q Fever occurs almost everywhere in the world. In Australia, cattle, sheep and goats are the main reservoir, although kangaroos and dogs can be infected.

There is an effective vaccine against Q fever, however it has significant side effects in persons who have already had Q fever ( local abscesses and even Q fever symptoms)

Before vaccination, a person must have three things:

  • A blood test
  • A skin test
  • A detailed history

These tests are undertaken to help avoid unwanted vaccine side effects. If one of the tests is positive, it means the subject would probably react badly to the vaccine.

Blood test and skin test need to be done on the SAME DAY. Then the person needs to return to the same doctor 7 days later to have the skin test read.

If both tests are negative, the person is vaccinated. It then takes about 2 weeks for the vaccine to become effective. This means persons vaccinated should not put themselves at risk ( e.g. visit abattoir) for 2 weeks after vaccination.

Each individual would discuss their particular situation at the time of screening. The vaccination is effective, and lasts for life.